CHAPTER I
THREE-FINGERED TECHNIQUE “P – I – M”
Introduction

1.1 Scales with “p – i – m”
Preparatory exercise for the right hand
Practice using “p – i – m” free stroke

1.2 Sequences of 5, 9 and 13 notes with “p – i – m”
Preparatory exercise for the right hand
Learn to play sequences of 5, 9 or 13 notes with “p”, “i” or “m” occurring on the last note of the sequence

1.3 Scale in binary rhythm with “p – i – m”
Train the right hand to equalize binary rhythms with “p – i – m” and to play accents free stroke

1.4 Scale in ternary rhythm with “p – i – m – i”
Train the right hand to equalize ternary rhythms with “p – i – m – i” and to play accents free stroke on a two-octave C major scale

1.5 scending and descending scales with “p – i – m”
Progressively prepare the right hand to play ascending and descending scales with “p – i – m” on multiple strings

1.6 Scale of descending thirds with “p – i – m”
Learn to cross “p – i – m” on a scale of descending thirds

1.7 Equalize “p – i – m” on a scale of descending and ascending thirds
Learn to cross the right-hand ngers on a scale of descending and ascending thirds

1.8 Ascending movements with “p – i – m”
Develop velocity and coordination in both hands

1.9 Descending scales with “p – i – m”
Develop velocity and coordination in both hands

1.10 Scales for the coordination of both hands
Equalize ascending or descending movements on a scale with hammer-ons and pull-offs, velocity exercises

1.11 Series of notes with “p – i – m” in binary rhythm
Distributing “p – i – m” in binary rhythm

 

CHAPTER II
ARPEGGIOS
Introduction

2.1 Study in E minor, by Dionisio Aguado (1784-1849)
Progressive exercises on variations of arpeggios in order to improve the necessary technique

2.2 Study No. 1, by Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887-1959)
Exercises for right hand stability, finger plants and fingers crossing strings

2.3 Arpeggios on four strings, with four, three and two right-hand fingers
Progressive exercises for fingers crossing strings

CHAPTER III
RHYTHMIC INDEPENDENCE
Introduction

3.1 Cross-rhythms Exercises on cross-rhythms 2:3 and 3:2, 3:4 and 4:3, and the 4:5 and 5:4

3.2 Rhythmic independence
Learn to play diverse cross-rhythms on open strings

3.3 Rhythmic independence and right-hand articulations
Learn to play diverse cross-rhythms using legato and staccato articulations on open strings

3.4 Rhythmic independence and hand coordination on two strings
Learn to play diverse cross-rhythms with both hands, and coordinate their finger-pairs on two strings with two simultaneous melodic lines

3.5 Rhythmic independence and hand coordination on four strings
Learn to perform diverse articulations and cross-rhythms with both hands, and coordinate their finger-pairs on four strings with two simultaneous melodic lines

3.6 Polyrhythmic sequences of 4:3:2:1
Learn to perform four simultaneous meters in the right hand

CHAPTER IV
LEFT-HAND FINGER INDEPENDENCE
Introduction

4.1 Equalize left-hand finger-pairs
Preparatory exercise for coordination and velocity

4.2 Left-hand finger extensions and flexibility
Learn to control two finger-pairs simultaneously – one attached to the fingerboard, the other which plays in simultaneous push-lift movements

4.3 Left-hand finger independence and velocity
Learn to hold and to lift the fingers simultaneously by pair; preparatory exercise on three strings

4.4 Left-hand finger independence and velocity
Learn to hold and to lift the fingers simultaneously over all strings

4.5 Left-hand finger extensions and flexibility
Exercises for finger-pair extensions and flexibility

4.6 Left-hand finger crossings and finger independence
Apply different pressures simultaneously in each finger

4.7 Left-hand finger crossings and finger independence
Apply different pressures simultaneously to each finger-pair

4.8 Left-hand finger crossings and finger independence
Apply a different pressure to each finger simultaneously: to press, to touch or to hold a note

4.9 Left-hand finger independence
Learn to control the necessary pressure in producing a real note

4.10 Barre and left-hand finger independence
Learn to press, hold and relax the fingers on a barre

4.11 Left-hand finger crossings and finger independence
Learn to control the pressure and duration of the left-hand fingers’ movements while playing legato

4.12 Double-note hammer-ons, finger extensions and finger crossings
Learn to coordinate double-note hammer-ons

4.13 Left hand only
Hammer-ons, pull-offs, and finger crossings
Push, tap, pull and hold the fingers simultaneously and independently

4.14 Left hand only
Finger crossings, finger independence, hammer-ons and pull-offs
Tap, push, and pull the fingers simultaneously and independently

4.15 Left hand only
Hammer-ons, pull-offs, and rhythmic independence
Train simultaneous opposite movements and coordinate finger-pairs on two strings

CHAPTER V
RIGHT-HAND FINGER INDEPENDENCE
Introduction

5.1 Preparatory exercise for the right hand only
Articulations and finger independence
Train the fingers to play and to stop the notes on two melodic lines simultaneously or independently

5.2 Exercise for the right hand only
Full plant and sequential plant

5.3 Exercise for the right hand only
Thumb independence
Train the thumb to play on the first string

5.4 Exercise for the right hand only
Develop thumb independence and flexibility

5.5 Exercise for the right hand only
Velocity and independence with “i – m – a”
Learn to quickly alternate between rest stroke and free stroke

5.6 Exercise for the right hand only
Velocity and finger independence with “p – i – m – a”
Develop wrist stability and practice simultaneous push-pull movements

5.7 Exercise for the right hand only
Develop hand velocity using “i – m” or “p – i – m”

5.8 Right-hand finger velocity, independence, and coordination
Preparatory exercise to Chapter VI

CHAPTER VI
COORDINATION OF THE HANDS
Finger coordination and independence
Hammer-ons, pull-offs, and hand synchronization and desynchronization

6.1a Left hand articulations
Train each of the hands to play and to stop notes simultaneously over two voices

6.1b Right hand articulations
Train each of the hands to play and to stop notes simultaneously over two voices

6.2 Hand Coordination
Coordination and desynchronization of the hands and their finger-pairs relative to one another

6.3 Finger independence
Articulations, coordination, hammer-ons and pull-offs
Coordinate the hands while practicing various articulations and simultaneous opposite movements

6.4 Finger independence
Hammer-ons and hand coordination
Learn to play hammer-ons in a chord

6.5 Finger independence
Double note hammer-ons and hand coordination
Learn to play double-note hammer-ons in a chord

6.6 Finger independence
Learn to play hammer-ons on crossed finger-pairs and neighboring strings

6.7 Finger independence
Hand coordination and rhythmic independence
Tap, push, pull and hold the fingers simultaneously and independently on cross-rhythms

6.8 Finger independence and hand coordination
Train left-hand fingers to lift high after each movement

6.9 Finger independence, hand synchronization and desynchronization
Develop finger independence and hand coordination

6.10 Hand synchronization and desynchronization
Develop the ability to play a sequence with the hands either in synchronization with each other or desynchronized

6.11 Finger flexibility, independence and hand coordination. Velocity exercises

6.12 Fingers and hands coordination
Velocity exercises

 

CHAPTER VII
STUDIES
Introduction

7.1 Prelude in A minor, by Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841)

7.2 Study No. 2, Op. 60, by Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853)

7.3 Study XIX, by Emilio Pujol (1886-1980)

7.4 Study, by Dionisio Aguado (1784-1849)

7.5 Prelude in C major by Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841)

7.6 Recuerdos de la Alhambra by Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909)

7.7 Sequence in the form of a study